The WildCare Foundation


Imagine seeing a lump on the side of the road. Suddenly you realize that it is an injured wild animal and it isn’t dead, yet! You stop and now you have a Great Horned owl with a broken wing or a turtle with a cracked shell or an injured mother opossum with babies in her pouch. That animal’s life literally lies in your hands. You want desperately to help but what can you do! Where do you go for help?


Saving the intricate fabric of life one delicate thread at a time

Proposed Rescue and Education Center

Proposed Rescue and Education Center

Baby skunks flooded out with the heavy rains from the tornado

Baby skunks flooded out with the heavy rains from the tornado

The coyotes were left homeless under debris

The coyotes were left homeless under debris

The devastation Oklahoman has witnessed is heart breaking. My heart aches for the people and pets that were impacted. But let us not overlook the wildlife. As the storm tore through residential areas it continued through the rural areas where wildlife once called home. Their songs will not be heard again.

In the three weeks following the May tornadoes WildCare has taken in 840 animals. Many came from the tornado areas across central Oklahoma. Then, May 31st the storms produced extensive flooding and hail. Golf ball sized hail hit WildCare’s facility breaking windows, tearing screens, denting roofs, and killing five birds in our enclosures. By the look on the interns faces I thought WildCare was about at the breaking point. Then the phone rang.

“This is Denise with International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) do you need help?” I had witness the compassion and support towards people and their pets, but not until this call had someone offered to directly help wildlife during these disasters. There have only been a few times in my life when I felt like I was being rescued and this was one. They sent Kelly and Diane, two IFAW experienced wildlife rehabbers to help for five days. The following is a post by Kelly describing her experience at WildCare.

“Day old fawns washed away from their mothers by flash flooding. Numerous Mississippi kites battered by giant hailstones. Hatchling hawks thrown violently from their nests, fracturing wings and breaking legs. Box turtles trapped under piles of rubble and timber, barely resembling the homes they once were. Countless orphaned raccoons, skunks, squirrels, opossums, bunnies, and songbirds separated permanently from their parents, who may not have survived the storms. These are the wildlife victims of natural disasters.

Baby raccoon found under the rubble days after the tornado rests comfortably at WildCare

Baby raccoon found under the rubble days after the tornado rests comfortably at WildCare

These are the ones that WildCare Foundation in Noble, Oklahoma, just a few miles south of Moore, are currently receiving in the hundreds. Since the EF-5 tornado on May 20th, only a few short weeks ago, over 600 hundred injured, orphaned, and displaced wildlife have been sent to this animal rehabilitation center as their only hope for healing, recuperation, and eventually a second chance at life as a wild animal. I cannot express enough the raw and genuine humanity and generosity I have witnessed the people at WildCare provide to every animal brought through their doors. From the tiniest mouse to the fiercest bobcat, every animal is treated with respect, dignity, and unyielding compassion.” Kelly Donithan

The outpouring of support to help domestic animals has been heart warming. Please do not forget Oklahoma’s wildlife. At this time, please consider making a donation to WildCare so the healing can continue for the wildlife in Oklahoma.

The financial burden WildCare is shoulder is substantial. In the days preceding the May 20th tornado WildCare was accepting an average of 21 animals per day. In the three weeks following we accepted an average of 40 per day. It is safe to assume that at least half of the 840 animals accepted, or 420 animals in the three weeks following were animals impacted by the storms. Last year WildCare used $227,930 in cash to treat 4,955 animals, or $46 per animal. 420 animals at an expense of $46 per animal is a financial burden of $19,320. Please support our efforts to heal Oklahoma’s wildlife tornado victims!

The WildCare Foundation provides a place for people to bring native injured or orphaned wild animals struggling to survive with the goal of releasing healthy animals back to nature. We are a wildlife rehabilitation facility for any wild animal native to Oklahoma. WildCare can assess the animal’s condition and provide the needed medical care and housing until recovered and healthy enough to be released back into the wild. WildCare believes that all wild species be it sparrow or eagle, opossum or bobcat play an important role in keeping the planet healthy. For this reason we accept and treat all wild native birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians.

The WildCare Foundation accepts and treats approximately 4,500 wild animals yearly that are struggling to survive with the ultimate goal of releasing all healthy animals back into their natural habitat. Since we began in 1984 we have cared for over 55,000 wild lives!

The WildCare Foundation needs your support! We are a non-profit [IRS 501(c)3] organization supported solely by donations from caring individuals like you. WildCare is also a Combined Federated Charity #57195. Please consider making a donation now to support our efforts. With your support many of these animals will see freedom again.

WildCare is excited to announce the new Wildlife Rescue and Education Center building campaign to raise $375,000 for a 5,200 square foot building located on WildCare’s 7 acres in Noble, Oklahoma.  The Wildlife Rescue and Education Center will allow the animals space for separate nurseries for songbirds, mammals, raptors, predators and reptiles along with a clinic. There will be room for food preparation, laundry, office space and even living space for Interns. But most importantly it will be an Education Center. Have you ever wondered how and where we care for these animals? Ever dream of watching the fawns romp amongst the trees? The Education Center will have viewing windows into several nurseries and remote cameras to many of the outside enclosures. To learn more about the Rescue and Education Center and how to donate go to our What’s New tab at http://www.wildcareoklahoma.org/blog.html .

Interested in find out more about business side of WildCare Foundation, go to